From our past NewsletteRS


On top of our monthly tips, we like to introduce and discuss new topics, interresting tips and facts.
Clic here to be added onto our newsletter list.
Below are some of our previous ones:

Ace of Spades
- The "no dig" issue, Bulbs planting

June in January - Why use manure? Top Wisteria tips
Stormy Weather - Fantastic Neem oil!, top tips for roses
Here comes the sun! - The Biochar issue
Subterranean Jungle - Rocket science
Soil is the new Prozac! - The New Year Issue

gENERAL


RHS Shows and events: List from the RHS

Visit beautiful gardens: RHS Garden finder

North London advice and support growing food: Master Gardener

Gardening advice and tasks calendar: here


tips


French Marigolds: use them on your vegetable border, a Fantastic insect repellent!

Watering house Plants: Leave the water in a see through plastic bottle for at least a day before using it, this will get rid of the bleach in the water!

Surviving the frost:  Little clay pots make great cloches for protecting young plants from sudden, overnight frosts and freezes

Clear soup water revival: The next time you boil or steam vegetables, use the water on your potted patio plants, they will love it!

PH levels: Use leftover tea and coffee grounds to acidify the soil of acid-loving plants such as azaleas, rhododendrons, camellias, gardenias and even blueberries.

Dirty fingers: To prevent accumulating dirt under your fingernails while you work in the garden, draw your fingernails across a bar of soap and you'll effectively seal the undersides of your nails so dirt can't collect beneath them.


BEAUTiful BUT SOMETIMES Annoying


Controlling aphids: organic gardening

Controlling vine weevil: Green gardener

List of pest repelling plants: wikipedia


More tips


Magic pen your hydrangeas: Just put some slate in the soil, it will make your hydrangeas grow bluer than blue. 

Poted worms: If infested with worms (a few worms is good though!), stick matches into the soil, sulfur end down. For an ordinary sized plant, use four matches–six for a large pot. The sulfur does the trick.

Are they ready yet? You can test seeds for maturity by dropping them into a container of water. The mature seeds will sink to the bottom while the unripe seeds will float to the top.